Kodiak – Spreo Superbus

All turbo charged and glistening with an aggressive retro sheen, juggernaut independent label Numbers have once again delivered the goods with their latest offering; Spreo Superbus from the now named Kodiak (I heard stories they were going to apply the moniker Milk at one point).

Retuning the engine to the big rig and possibly having a word with Jay Kay from Jamiroquai along the way, Fact described it as “[a] track that sounds like driving a Ferrari straight into the middle of a packed dance floor”, and you know what, that’s bang on!

Before hearing the original mix, I heard the Actress remix. A very different direction. It’s got the future laser blasts whilst also making you think you’re back in 1983, having a chin wag with Tony Montana early morning in the Miami harbour when he’s in one of his more sombre moods. There’s a healthy slice of grit thrown in mid way (shit, Tony’s flipping out on me), but it mellows down again nicely to round off.

It’s nice to see a bit of attention’s been given to the video angle too. Someone’s obviously remembered about that flight sim game you could get in Microsoft Excel back in the 90s, filmed themselves playing it a slapped some nice colours on the top. I think it works.

Kodiak – Spreo Superbus is released on Monday 5 March on Numbers. You’ll probably find it in a record shop like one of these // Piccadilly Records // Rubadub

Follow Kodiak on twitter // @k_odia_k

Mickey Pearce – Don't Ask Don't Get

Over time, people change, it’s a fact. They absorb the world around them, it influences them and they progress as individuals. Some even change their name! In the case of the artist formerly known as shortstuff, he’s moved on with certainty with his new moniker; Mickey Pearce and crowned this shift with a mighty release on Loefah’s Swamp81 vinyl only label.

The new name’s no secret, the man’s been wearing both hats for some time now, and the official shift happened a while back. I’ve been waiting (much like Ed with his SBTRKT show) for a fair while to finally get my hands on what had proved to be a pretty elusive track in the digital world of music that I often trawl, and wanted to wait until I had a copy of Don’t Ask Don’t Get / I Am firmly planted on the platter before I threw my tuppence worth down.

I’ve heard the title track Don’t Ask, Don’t Get snapping along on a few radio shows for the past 3/4 months now and was sold on stories of a late October / early November release. Only in the last week, upon hearing B-side I Am in full for the first time did I twig that the tracks were finally out.

Tribal in its introduction, industrial in its body and with a pulsing wave swell of bass rippling underneath, you catch yourself latching on to subtleties in the production with each new listen of Don’t Ask, Don’t Get. It’s a song of multiple movements, a full days travel packed into one six minute offering.

For a flavour of how this track should be embedded into a mix (which it should), listen back to MP’s mix for Mary Anne Hobbs’ XFM show late last month.

On the back of the limited press vinyl only release (don’t even bother trying to hunt this down digitally online, you’re going to need to smash the piggy bank and walk to the shops to have this one) is another stripped tribal affair. I am opens as more of a dance floor ready beat before dragging you under with its aggressive, again mechanical, almost alien sounding rasps and vocal splashes.

With a release roster that’s included the likes of The Bug, Kryptic Minds, Addison Groove, Skream and Ramadanman, Mickey Pearce’s first outing on Swamp81 is a progression for both the label and artist. Get your copy from Surus.

Dub Phizix & Skeptical feat. Strategy – Marka

Like most of us I think, December was a busy busy month. To be fair January hasn’t started any differently. One thing I have had a bit more time to do is catch up on my new music listening.

Lots of Christmas CDs / vinyls / DVDs to catch up on, too many to digest properly. It’s probably not surprising that the track that’s really got me standing to attention is one that I wasn’t expecting to hear. “Have you heard my mate’s new track?” a friend said to me over a post Christmas lunch catch up. We’ve all got mates in bands / making music / writing a book, and a lot of the time an invitation to listen to their offerings can be a bit awkward. “Oh wow, that’s really interesting” is a common response, “I can really see the potential there”. Thankfully, the friend that put me on to this has a good track record for nodding me in the direction of some pretty weighty productions.

The names Dub Phizix, Skeptical and Strategy all have sway in their own right. Dub Phizix and Skeptical known for their productions in the Drum & Bass scene, Strategy for his MCing in Broke ‘n’ £nglish. So on paper, the expectation around a collaboration of the three is pretty big. You won’t be disappointed with “Marka”!

You’re going to need a stereo that can handle some devastatingly low frequencies to take this track on. Those mac speakers just ain’t gonna cut the mustard. The bullet kick and waves of sub bass coupled with Strategy’s rhyme is hypnotic in it’s pulsing feel. Tempo wise it’s half time drum and bass, but the feel is dubstep circa 2004. Think Leofah, Hatcha, Digital Mystics and early Skream. There’s a sparseness that you don’t get in many modern productions. This lack of excess fat allows you to pick out the eerie creaks and chimes that litter this track, dragging you down into its dingy depths.

The fact that the track is offered up alongside a similarly minimal, voodoo Indian, video takes the appeal level up tenfold. I’m reliably informed that it was shot in park and woodland in the “Costa del” Salford. For all I know this could be deepest darkest hell.

Dub Phizix & Skeptical - Marka feat. Strategy

Released on dBridge’s Exit Records, Marka is available from all good music vendors now.

[Also check out Dub Phizix’s remix of Skittles – Dot2Dot here]

Santiago Street Machine – Noisemaker

Manchester alternative electro three piece Santiago Street Machine released their debut single, Noisemaker, today.

Alongside a rampant, thumping, grit fuelled, bassy monster of a track, they’ve linked up with some very talented photographers, videographers and graphic designers to bring a triple threat track, video and artwork.

The single artwork features a photograph by Cambridge based photographer Tom Mayle with graphics from London based designer Ed Chandler. It’s an explosive photo which sets off the explosive sound of the track well.

No single release is complete without a music video, and London based duo James Gough and Steve Roberts (Master Original Dub) have delivered an intriguing watch to accompany the track. The steps needed to make that “noise” with your debut offering can ride on the flip of a coin decision, as the video portrays. Some young acting talent on show too from Alex Payne and Isabella Lueen.

You can pick up the single now on iTunes, Amazon and all the other big download sites. Next live show is at London hot spot Cargo on Saturday 17 December.

Mosca – Done Me Wrong / Bax

I didn’t really latch on to Mosca first time around. Releasing his debut offering, the Square One EP, on Bok Bok and L-Vis 1990’s club night turned label, Night Slugs, in 2010, I heard the hype but just wasn’t being pushed over the edge into euphoria for the music like others seemed to be.

And I mean, this EP got plaudits. The “b-side”, Nike got voted superblog XLR8R’s track of 2010, and when you have five (you can only just count ’em on one hand) remixes of the title track on your debut release from names like Roska, Julio Bashmore, Greena, L-Vis 1990 and Bok Bok, there’s clearly something nifty going on.

So, the record collection was still awaiting it’s first Mosca purchase. Needless to say (you may have seen this coming), it’s now happened. Marking the 16th release on the Numbers label, Done Me Wrong / Bax is a heady throwback to garage sounds from 10 years ago muddled with an assortment of tropical bells and elastic dubby stabs.

No Mars bars will be awarded for guessing the influences that have gone into these tracks, they’re pretty clear. What I like is that there are so many and that they come together in such a coherent way. There’s mellow moments, the face is screwed in appreciation at others, and you’re definitely stepping the whole way through.

You’ll undoubtedly hear both of these tracks jammed into sets up and down the land for the rest of the year. If you’re up late after a club session next Wednesday night, I highly recommend tuning into Benji B where Mosca will be having a chin wag and tickling us with a 30 minute mix.


Done Me Wrong by Mosca


Bax by Mosca

“Come on!”